Meatless Monday

Meatless Monday?
No way.
Let’s stop reinforcing the idea that there is a morally coherent distinction between meat and other animal foods.
There isn’t.
Today is Vegan Monday.
Tomorrow is Vegan Tuesday.
It’s Vegan Every Day.
It’s Vegan Life.
If animals matter morally, going vegan is the only rational response.

Fundamental moral right

Video: Animals as Property
http://vimeo.com/4807775
http://www.abolitionistapproach.com/video/#animals-as-propertyProfessor Francione argues that the property status of animals renders meaningless animal welfare laws that prohibit the infliction of “unnecessary” suffering and require the “humane” treatment of nonhumans. Professor Francione’s book, Animals, Property, and the Law (Temple University Press, 1995), provided the first legal analysis of the property status of animals and was described by Tom Regan as a “work of unquestionable historic importance.”

Tell the mother…

We keep hearing welfarists say that most people who go vegan went vegetarian first, so we should promote going vegetarian.

We keep hearing welfarists say that if we promote “happy” meat and other “happy” animal products, that will lead people to go vegan eventually.

This is all nonsense. There is no empirical evidence that establishes a causal link between anynon-vegan situation and veganism.

To the extent that people go vegetarian before they go vegan, or eat “happy” meat or eggs or whatever before they go vegan, is it any surprise?

Animal organizations all promote vegetarianism and “happy” exploitation.  Not one promotes veganism as an unequivocal moral baseline.

It is our responsibility to make clear that if animals matter morally, we are obligated to go vegan. If someone cares about animals but wants to do less, that should be their choice and never what we promote.

Telling people that vegetarianism, “happy” meat, “Meatless Monday,” “vegan before 6,” or “flexible veganism” are morally acceptable will just delay progress, and not lead to it.

~ Gary L. Francione

Monday: Your Choice

http://www.abolitionistapproach.com/monday-choice/#.VQyVTNLF9JM

Dark chocolate, chocolate chip cookie dough nice cream

Simple and satisfying.

Ingredients

For the cookie dough
1 1/2T cashew butter
1T whole wheat flour
2t cocoa powder (I use a fairly traded Dutch process brand)
1 1/2T coconut sugar
A pinch coarse sea salt
1-3t unsweetened plant milk (I use soy)
5g bittersweet chocolate, chipped (I use an organic, fairly traded bar)
Sweetener to taste

For the bananas
2 medium frozen bananas (about 2 cups)
1/2t vanilla extract
Sweetener to taste

Optional: 1t powdered maca root. Trade the wheat flour for an appropriate gluten free flour (e.g., sorghum). The coconut sugar crystals give the right texture, but other sweeteners will work. You can also use a few prepackaged chocolate chips.

Method

Combine the cashew butter, flour, salt, sugar,and cocoa until crumbly. Add the plant milk starting with 2t until a smooth dough forms. If too dry, add plant milk one teaspoon at at time until you have a smooth dough (it shouldn’t require more than 3t). Mix in the chipped chocolate. Set aside.

Blend the bananas with the vanilla until smooth. Sweeten to taste (if necessary) with dates, maple syrup, agave nectar or stevia. Add 1T cookie dough and blend with the bananas for a more consistent flavour; leave them separate for more contrast. Break the cookie dough into 1/2 – 1t sized bites, add to the bananas and stir once or twice to distribute. Spoon out and serve!

Tacos with spicy tempeh, white miso sauce and baby greens

Soft, hand rolled corn tortillas, warm spicy tempeh and lime accented greens make this a lovely and flavourful dish. Fresh tortillas are terrific and when you make them from scratch, you control all of the ingredients. Be sure to use masa harina rather than regular corn flour
for this recipe. This makes eight small tacos.

Ingredients

For the tempeh
1T cooking oil
1T fresh garlic, minced
1T red Thai chili paste (or similar and/or to taste)
250g tempeh, crumbled (use pasteurized)
1/4 cup tamari (or to taste)
1 cup vegetable stock
1/4t coarse sea salt

For the tortillas
1 1/2 cups masa harina
1/2T ground flax seed
1/2t coarse sea salt
1 cup hot water

For the white sauce
1 cup unsweetened plant milk (I use soy)
1/4t coarse sea salt
1T white vinegar
1T sesame seed butter
1T white miso
2T tapioca flour dissolved in 2T cold water
Sea salt and black pepper to taste

For the greens
1T olive oil
1t lime juice
1/4t coarse sea salt
1T nutritional yeast
1 cup loose baby kale
1 cup loose baby spinach

For the garnish
1/2 cup passata (or tomato puree)
1/2t red Thai chili paste (or similar and/or to taste)
Coarse sea salt and black pepper to taste.
2T nutritional yeast

Method

First, start the tempeh, then the tortillas, the white sauce, the greens and the garnish.

In a frying pan with a lid, bring the oil and sea salt to heat on medium high. Add the garlic and chili and fry for 2 minutes. Add the tempeh and fry for 3-5 minutes. Add the tamari and deglaze the pan.
Add the stock, cover, reduce heat to low and simmer for 45 minutes.

While the tempeh simmers, make the tortillas. Mix the dry ingredients and add the water. Stir to form a smooth, pliable dough, neither too dry nor moist. If the dough is too wet, add more masa 1T at at time; if too dry, add water 1T at a time. Divide the dough into 8 equal parts, and flatten each into a 2-3″ round disk. Cover the dough with a damp cloth while you press the tortillas.

Heat a frying pan on medium high heat. If you have a tortilla press, follow the instructions provided.
If you don’t, roll the tortillas out gently between two sheets of plastic wrap into rough circles about 1/8″ thick, about 5-6″ in diameter. It’s the peeling of the tortilla that’s of the most difficult part — go slowly. Carefully peel and add the tortilla and cook until the top of the tortilla is start to look dry. Flip and cook the other side (it should be about 1 minute each side, a little more on the first, a little less on the second).Little brown spots make a tortilla look lovely. Repeat for the remaining 7 tortillas and cover with a warm, very lightly damp tea towel.

Let the tortillas rest for about 20 minutes to cool and soften until you’re ready to use. The tortillas will keep, but you’ll likely have to steam them to use them later. At the 40 minute mark, preheat the oven to 450F. In a shallow pan with sides, bake the tempeh for another 20 minutes or until the moisture has been absorbed the tempeh has started to brown. Ovens vary; use the colour as your guide. Don’t overcook.

Start the white sauce and broil the tempeh for another 5 minutes. In a small sauce pan, bring the soy milk to a simmer. Add the sea salt, miso, sesame seed butter and vinegar. Stir to combine and simmer for 5 minutes uncovered. Slowly add the tapioca solution stirring continuously until it thickens.
Remove from heat and season to taste. Remove the tempeh from the oven. Let the white sauce and the tempeh cool for a few minutes.

While they cool, whisk the dressing for the greens and toss. Whisk the ingredients for the garnish.
To assemble, fill each tortilla with 3-4T tempeh, 2T white sauce, 1/4 cup greens and then about 2t passata mixture. Sprinkle with nutritional yeast and serve.

Black lentil mezzaluna in a sesame white sauce with oyster mushrooms and kale

Similar to pierogi, mezzaluna are a lovely and decorative pasta, filled here with a lightly spicy combination of black beluga lentils, poblano peppers and Brussels sprouts, served in and a rich sauce of white miso, sesame seed butter and oyster mushrooms. This makes an appetizer portion for 4 or large plate for 2.

Ingredients

For the filling
1/4 cups black lentils
2/3 cups water
1 ‘sprig’ dried kombu (about 1/2″)
1T cooking oil
1/4t coarse sea salt
1 scallion, minced (3″ – 4″ green reserved for garnish)
1/4 cup poblano pepper, chopped finely
2 Brussels sprouts (about 1/4 cup scant), minced (or green cabbage)
Coarse sea salt and black pepper to taste
For the dough
1 cup semolina flour
A pinch sea salt
1/3 cup water
1t olive oil
2 liters water and 2t coarse sea salt for boiling
For the sauce
1T cooking oil
1/4t coarse sea salt
1/2t dried basil, rubbed
1/4t dried oregano, rubbed
1T fresh garlic, minced
1/4 cup oyster mushroom, wiped and finely chopped
1/2T lemon juice
1 cup unsweetened plant milk
1T sesame seed butter (I use a fairly traded brand)
1 cup green curly kale, finely chopped
1T arrowroot flour dissolved in 1T cold water
1/2T white miso
2T nutritional yeast
Coarse sea salt and black pepper to taste

Optional: Replace the Brussel sprouts with sun-dried tomatoes for something slightly more flavourful.

Method

Start the filling first, then the pasta, then the sauce. In a small pan with a lid, bring the water to a boil. Add the lentils. Reduce heat to low, cover and simmer for about 30-40 minutes or until the water is absorbed and the lentils are tender. When the lentils are done, remove the kombu, rinse the lentils and set aside.

While the lentils simmer, make the pasta dough. Mix the flour and salt. Mix the water and oil. Mix the wet and the dry. The dough may seem too dry initially. Keep mixing, and then knead until as a smooth elastic dough forms, and then another 2-3 minutes. Cover with a warm wet tea towel and set aside to rest for at least 30 minutes.

When the lentils are ready, in a medium frying pan, bring the oil to eat on medium high. Add the cooking oil and sea salt. Add the scallion. Saute for 2 minutes. Add the pepper and Brussels sprouts and saute for 5 minutes. Add the lentils and stir to combine. Remove from heat. Set aside covered to cool.

Roll out the dough on a floured board in a large rectangle about 1/10″ thin. Cut small circles about 2 1/2″ round. Bunch up leftover dough, roll out and cut. Repeat until all of the dough has been used. Aim for 16 circles.

When the dough has been cut, add a heaping tablespoon of filling to each in an oblong shape in the middle. Carefully pinch closed, starting with the top, one side, and then the other. Squeeze out any excess air. Crimp both sides of the seam with a fork. Let sit to dry lightly while you make the sauce.

In a large pan with a lid, bring the cooking oil and sea salt to heat with the sea salt on medium high. Add the green herbs and saute for 1 minute. Add the garlic and saute for 1 minute. Add the oyster mushrooms and saute for 2 minutes. Add the lemon juice and deglaze the pan. Add the soy milk. Bring the pan to a light simmer. Add the sesame seed butter and stir to dissolve. Simmer lightly, stirring occasionally while you finish the pasta.

In a large pot, bring the 2 liters water to a boil with the sea salt. Add the mezzaluna carefully to the water and boil lightly until they float (should be 3-5 minutes). They’ll float when done. Don’t overcook. Drain them carefully in a colander, reserving 2T of the pasta water. Rinse the pasta gently with cool water.

Add the pasta water and the kale to the sauce and stir to combine. Simmer another 2 minutes. Stirring continuously, add the arrowroot mixture until it thickens. Remove from heat. Add the white miso and stir until dissolved. Rinse the mezzaluna with hot water, drain and add them to the sauce. Stir gently to coat. Let stand 2-3 minutes to cool. Season to taste.

When lightly cooled, plate the mezzaluna and pour sauce over them. Add the scallion greens sliced on an angle. Dust with nutritional yeast, and serve.

Miso noodle soup with kale and mushrooms

Simple and satisfying with nourishing miso and chewy noodles simmered in the broth. This recipe easily doubles.

Ingredients

For the soup
2T water
1/4t coarse sea salt
1 scallion, minced (2″ – 3″ green reserved for garnish)
75g cremini mushrooms, 1/4″ slices
1/2T lemon juice
1/2T tamari
2 cups water
1 ‘sprig’ dried kombu (about 1″)
1-2T red soy miso (to taste)
1 cup green kale, coarsely chopped
Coarse sea salt (or tamari) and black pepper to taste

For the noodles
1/4 cup whole wheat bread flour
2-3T cold water
A pinch sea salt

Optional: Additional sea vegetables will go well in this soup, as would sesame seeds for garnish. Replace the cremini mushrooms with shiitake mushrooms if you prefer. Use white miso or just 1T red miso for something a little more neutral in taste. Add a few drops of toasted sesame oil with the scallions for a little additional flavour.

Method

Make the noodles first, then the soup. Mix the flour, salt and water together until a smooth dough forms. If you need to add extra water, do so a teaspoon at a time. Knead for 3 minutes and set aside in a bowl covered with a warm, moist tea towel. Let rest for at least 10 minutes. Knead another 3 minutes. Return to the bowl for another 10 minutes to rest. Knead another 3 minutes. Return to the bowl for a final 10 minutes.

On a floured board, roll the dough out to a large rectangle, about 1/8″ thick and no less than 9″ long. Using a wheeled pastry cutter, cut 1/4″ noodles, or fold very gently length-wise into thirds (in an S-curve) and cut the noodles with a knife if you prefer. Let the noodles rest while you make the soup.
Bring a large pan with a lid to heat on medium high. Add the water, sea salt, scallions, and mushrooms. Stir fry for 3-5 minutes, or until the pan is starting to brown and the mushrooms are softening. Add the lemon and tamari and deglaze the pan. Stir fry another 2 minutes. Add the water and kombu, and return the pan to a simmer. Simmer uncovered for 10 minutes.

At the 10 minute mark, add the noodles and simmer for 2 minutes. Add the kale and simmer another two minutes. Remove from heat and let stand 2 minutes to cool. Add the miso and stir to combine. Season to taste. Ladle out, garnish with scallions sliced on an angle, and serve.

Peanut butter, chocolate chip cookies with ginger and molasses

The ginger and molasses add a little flavour nuance to this rich, flaky cookie. This makes about a dozen larger cookies, up to two dozen small ones.

Ingredients

1/2 cup unsweetened, unsalted peanut butter (I use crunchy)
1/3 cup coconut oil
1T cold water
1/4t coarse sea salt
1/2 cup turbinado sugar (or more to taste if you have a sweet tooth)
1t blackstrap molasses
1/2t fresh ginger, grated and minced (or more to taste — I use 1t)
1/2 cup all purpose, unbleached flour
2/3 cup whole wheat flour (I use bread flour)
1/4 cup unsweetened plant milk
25g bittersweet chocolate, chipped (I use a fairly traded, organic brand)

Optional: Use ready-made chocolate chips you prefer. You can make smaller cookies, use pastry flour instead of bread flour, use all whole wheat flour, change the sweetener, trade the coconut oil and water for plant-only margarine, add flax or banana for some additional binder, or make an all peanut butter version, but this will affect the overall chemistry. You may have to change the liquid balance and/or the bake time.

Method

Preheat the oven to 350F. Cream the peanut butter with everything up to and including the ginger. Mix the flours and stir the combination into the peanut butter. Stir in the plant milk. Add the chipped chocolate to the dough, reserving about 1/3 to add to the cookies once pressed.

On a baking sheet lined with parchment paper, add the dough in about 2 tablespoon sizes. Press a little of the remaining chocolate into each cookie. Press each cookie lightly with a fork to crosshatch so that each is no more than 1/2″ high.

Bake on the middle rack for 12-15 minutes, shorter for softer cookies, longer for crunchier cookies, depending on your oven. Be careful not to overbake. Ovens vary; use the colour and texture of the cookie as a guide to bake time (they should be lightly browning at the tips for soft cookies).

Remove from the oven and cool on a wire frame for about 30 – 45 minutes for still warm, soft cookies, or cool for an hour or so, cover, and serve later.